Monkey

By: Alexis Low

Horror isn’t just on the screen or a written account. While its in every part of life, we probably don’t recognize it, because we have suppressed our feeling or simply ignored the problem and held no significance at the time. It takes one instance for us to be reminded something happened, and when we remember the unexplainable horror, we no longer know what to do. We come up with an unfathomable amount of logical reasons, working with one theory after the next, then we give up. This feeling is similar to the anime Erased, which tells of a man with powers to go back in time.

One day, the main character’s mother was watching the news of a child abduction, she asked him if he remembered that happening when he was younger. All it took was a simple horrific newsfeed, and he remembered a classmate who went missing and found later in a trash bag. He tries again and again to prevent it from happening, going from theory to theory, attempting to erase that event from happening. However, we don’t have that power, we only have theories of why horrific things happen, especially if they contain a hint of the supernatural.

I didn’t have the power to fix a past horror that occurred when I was younger. I recently watched a commercial about stuffed animals, and it reminded me of the strange occurrences of my imaginary friend, Monkey.

Before the event with my grandmother’s doll and The Twilight Zone, there was Monkey. He was my first imaginary friend, he fit in my hand, I talked to him constantly, and he even had his own place in the car. My imaginary Monkey and stuffed monkey looked like a combination of Curious George and the lemur from Zoboomafoo. He was my only friend, and since he was in my mind, I would always have him. However, in some type of crack-pot-theory, my parents gave me a physical version of my imaginary friend, in order to physically take him away from me (making the separation permanent); to my parents, I shouldn’t have had an imaginary friend.

imgMoreover, once Monkey got a ‘physical’ form, in the next couple of days, my sister’s hamster would be dead in its cage, the smell was horrid; I will never forget it. In the next few days Monkey was stolen from me, I asked my parents where my monkey had gone. They told me that Monkey needed to go, while the cranky garbage truck groaned and went on to the next house. I cried, but I had to ‘grow up’.

After the incident with my grandmother’s doll, I ran to my cousin’s house, to which I found my stuffed Monkey, he came back to me. I thought, ‘Why would my cousins have Monkey, they are too old for him?’, ‘Did my parents give him to them?’, but I quickly dismissed the thoughts. I was excited and overjoyed, however, when I went back home, my parents were dismayed and had a look of contempt at Monkey.

However, I didn’t understand why. Until, two weeks later, I started smelling a strange odor, a similar odor, from a while ago, it was death. I thought it was a dead neighborhood possum, dog, or squirrel. The bird I used to feed was dead, on the ground, by the birdfeeder. I thought it was the bird, but it was something else. I couldn’t figure out what it was until I was woken up by sirens and dogs barking; next door, in an abandoned house, a body was found, six feet deep.

Monkey was by the window, his back to me. I tried to reason why Monkey was turned that way, maybe I had rolled over too much in bed, but I laid all night in the same position.

Was it a coincidence? Did Monkey have something to do with this? The smell of death isn’t easily forgotten. Did my parents realize this before me, or was it just a brief response to end the conversation? Did he do something else? Was this really just a coincidence? To me, there are no coincidences. Monkey needed to go.

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5 thoughts on “Monkey

  1. Totally creepy! This is very similar to my Cinderella toothbrush story, which I got rid of because it seemed to be haunted. It’s sad when a thing that you really like seems to be connected to a lot of eerie events. I also don’t really believe in coincidences so I think it was a good move to get rid of Monkey!

  2. This is so creepy! This really scares me, and I cannot imagine being in a situation similar to this. How old were you at the time? Monkey does not seem like a great friend to keep around, and its interesting how parents sometimes have inklings that are true.

  3. WOW! beyond creepy and extremely well written! I did not see that coming in the slightest. Did you end up asking your parents about this? I’m curious if they just didn’t want you to have stuffed animals/ imaginary friends and maybe wanted you to be more social or if there really was a connection and something they knew.

  4. This was really well written. My attention was grabbed from the start, and the eloquent word choice really added to the horror. Did you ever ask your parents about Monkey being at your cousins’ house? Did they ever confirm that they threw him away, or is it actually possible that they gave him to your cousins? Did you steal Monkey from your cousins’ house or did he follow you home? So many questions! There was a murder that happened a couple houses down from me, and I know how creepy that it can be in and of itself, but adding in the Monkey staring out the window is so much worse!

  5. Super creepy and great story-telling. It is really interesting to think about imaginary friends because I had an imaginary friend Mira who lived in mirrors, like every mirror that I saw was Mira. Super weird and my parents hated it. My sisters did as well, so much that they smashed the mirror in my room so I would stop talking to mirrors. Anyway, did you ask your parents how your cousins got Monkey? Or is it possible that it was a different physical monkey stuffed animal (that looked identical) and the evil “spirit” or whatever you want to call it just inhabited whatever stuffed animal he found appropriate to do what he needed to do? Either way, it sounds really creepy and I hate inanimate objects moving on their own!

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